Theme: Exploiting power of Microbes for the Industrial Development

Beneficial Microbes 2016

Beneficial Microbes 2016

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Conference Series LLC is organizing 2nd World Congress on Beneficial Microbes: Food, Pharma, Aqua & Beverages Industry on September, 22-24, 2016 Phoenix,USA. The theme of the conference is “Exploiting the power of Microbes for the Industrial Development”. This congress is expecting audience such as experts from food microbiology, aquaculture microbiology, probiotics, and experts from academics as well as industrial microbiology.

Track 1: Microbial Enzymes

Enzymes are considered as a potential biocatalyst for a large number of reactions. Particularly, the microbial enzymes have widespread uses in industries and medicine. The microbial enzymes are also more active and stable than plant and animal enzymes. In addition, the microorganisms represent an alternative source of enzymes because they can be cultured in large quantities in a short time by fermentation biology and owing to their biochemical diversity and susceptibility to gene manipulation. Industries are looking for new microbial strains in order to produce different enzymes to fulfill the current enzyme requirements. This special issue covers ten articles including three review articles, mainly highlighting the importance and applications of biotechnologically and industrially valuable microbial enzymes.

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Probiotics & Functional Foods, September 26-28, 2016 Orlando, USA, International Conference on Water Microbiology and Novel Techniques, Chicago, USA, July 18-20, 2016, 4thInternational Conference on Oceanography and Marine Biology, Brisbane, Australia, July 18-20, 2016, 2nd International Congress on Biofuels and Bioenergy, August 29-31, 2016 Sao Paulo, Brazil,  International Conference on Microbial Physiology and Genomics  London. UK, September 29-30, 2016, Microbiology Society, International Society for Enzymology, Federation of European Biochemical Society, American Society for Microbiology.

Track 2 : Microbial Physiology and Screening

Microbial Physiology: Prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms-Comparison, Flagella, motility and process of chemotaxis- uptake and utilization of substrates, Sporulation and germination- Two component signal transduction. Microbial nutrition  and growth-Physical and Nutritional Requirements of Cells - batch, continuous and synchronous cultures, growth kinetics – Control of microbial growth. Microbial biofilms - The physiology and collective recalcitrance of microbial biofilm communities: Quorum sensing and quenching mechanisms. Microbial stress responses: Heat, temperature, pH Microbial energy stores, Microbial biofuel cells and applications. Special emphasis will be placed on demonstrating the role of prokaryotic structures in evolutionary adaptation, disease establishment and their potential as targets for the development of antibiotics and/or therapeutics.

Related Conferences:

2nd International Conference on  Retroviruses and Novel Drugs, June 30- July 01, Cape Town, South Africa; World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 3rd Microbiologists Annual Meeting, August 15-17, 2016, Portland, Oregon, USA; 2nd World Congress on Infectious Diseases, August 24-26, 2016, Philadelphia, USA; 3rd Euro-Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, September 5-7, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany; World Congress on Infection Prevention and Control, September 5-6, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany;  7th International Congress on Clinical Virology, October 13-14, 2016, Manchester, UK, American Society for Virology International Union of Microbiological Societies Pan-American Society for Clinical Virology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies  European Union, and European Society for Virology.

Track  3: Microbial Pathogens

Microbes are things like bacteria and viruses that are too small to see with the naked eye. They exist on every surface and in every environment on Earth. They’re in the air, in the water, in the soil , even in your body. Most microbes can’t hurt you, and many of them are beneficial to the environment or your body. In fact, life on Earth couldn't even exist without microbes! But a few microbes, called pathogens, grab all the headlines because they’re the ones that cause diseases in humans. The need to determine what type of microbial pathogen is responsible for disease has led to the development of many sophisticated assays for bacteria, viruses or protozoa in clinical specimens. However, these methods have rarely been applied to environmental samples. This project adapts existing methods and develops new combinations of bacterial pathogen assays for application to environmental samples. Prioritization for assay development is based on considerations similar to those for chemical contaminants.

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Probiotics & Functional Foods, September 26-28, 2016 Orlando, USA, International Conference on Water Microbiology and Novel Techniques, Chicago, USA, July 18-20, 2016, 4thInternational Conference on Oceanography and Marine Biology, Brisbane, Australia, July 18-20, 2016, 2nd International Congress on Biofuels and Bioenergy, August 29-31, 2016 Sao Paulo, Brazil,  International Conference on Microbial Physiology and Genomics  London. UK, September 29-30, 2016, Microbiology Society, International Society for Enzymology, Federation of European Biochemical Society, American Society for Microbiology.

Track 4: Microbial Corrosion

Microbiologically-Influenced Corrosion (MIC), also known as microbial corrosion or biological corrosion, is the deterioration of metals as a result of the metabolic activity of microorganisms. There are about a dozen of bacteria known to cause microbiologically influenced corrosion of carbon steels, stainless steels, aluminum alloys and copper alloys in water and soils with pH 4~9.These bacteria can be broadly classified as aerobic (requires oxygen to become active) or anaerobic (oxygen is toxic to the bacteria). Sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) is anaerobic and is responsible for most instances of accelerated corrosion damages to ships and offshore steel structures. Iron and manganese oxidizing bacteria are aerobic and are frequently associated with accelerated pitting attacks on stainless steels at welds.

Related Conferences:

World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; International Conference on Water Microbiology & Novel Technologies- July 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 3rd  Global Microbiologists Annual meeting -August 15-17, 2016 Portland, USA; Microbial Physiology conference- September 29-30, 2016; London, UK; Infectious Diseases Conference- Oct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; Clinical Microbiology Conference- October 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; 7th World Congress on Applied Microbiology, November 10-12, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey, Microbiology Society , International Union of Microbiological Societies , American Society for Microbiology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies European Union, and The Royal Society of Pathologists UK.

Track 5: Microbial Testing

A microbial test is a laboratory test that checks for the presence of microorganisms in a sample provided to the laboratory. Such testing is used for product safety, to look for signs of contamination in products that will be sold to the public, and for lab control, to confirm that the products and equipment being used in a lab are not contaminated with microorganisms. It is also possible to conduct some basic testing in the field without having to send samples to a lab. Food products, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and water are common sources of samples for a microbial test. There are strict requirements about the facilities where such products are processed and handled that are designed to reduce the risk of contamination, but even with careful adherence to standards and procedures, contaminants can creep in. A microbial test confirms that the products are safe to distribute.

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Probiotics & Functional Foods, September 26-28, 2016 Orlando, USA, International Conference on Water Microbiology and Novel Techniques, Chicago, USA, July 18-20, 2016, 4thInternational Conference on Oceanography and Marine Biology, Brisbane, Australia, July 18-20, 2016, 2nd International Congress on Biofuels and Bioenergy, August 29-31, 2016 Sao Paulo, Brazil,  International Conference on Microbial Physiology and Genomics  London. UK, September 29-30, 2016, Microbiology Society, International Society for Enzymology, Federation of European Biochemical Society, American Society for Microbiology.

Track 6: Microbial Degradation

Interest in the microbial biodegradation of pollutants has intensified in recent years as mankind strives to find sustainable ways to clean up contaminated environments. These bioremediation and biotransformation methods endeavour to harness the astonishing, naturally occurring, microbial catabolic diversity to degrade, transform or accumulate a huge range of compounds including hydrocarbons (e.g. oil), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pharmaceutical substances, radionuclides and metals. Major methodological breakthroughs in recent years have enabled detailed genomic, metagenomic, proteomic, bioinformatic and other high-throughput analyses of environmentally relevant microorganisms providing unprecedented insights into key biodegradative pathways and the ability of organisms to adapt to changing environmental conditions.

Related Conferences:

2nd International Conference on  Retroviruses and Novel Drugs, June 30- July 01, Cape Town, South Africa; World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 3rd Microbiologists Annual Meeting, August 15-17, 2016, Portland, Oregon, USA; 2nd World Congress on Infectious Diseases, August 24-26, 2016, Philadelphia, USA; 3rd Euro-Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, September 5-7, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany; World Congress on Infection Prevention and Control, September 5-6, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany;  7th International Congress on Clinical Virology, October 13-14, 2016, Manchester, UK, American Society for Virology International Union of Microbiological Societies Pan-American Society for Clinical Virology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies  European Union, and European Society for Virology.

Track 7: Microbial Biofilms

Microorganisms attach to surfaces and develop biofilms. Biofilm-associated cells can be differentiated from their suspended counterparts by generation of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix, reduced growth rates, and the up- and down- regulation of specific genes. Attachment is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of the growth medium, substratum, and cell surface. An established biofilm structure comprises microbial cells and EPS, has a defined architecture, and provides an optimal environment for the exchange of genetic material between cells. Cells may also communicate via quorum sensing, which may in turn affect biofilm processes such as detachment. Biofilms have great importance for public health because of their role in certain infectious diseases and importance in a variety of device-related infections. A greater understanding of biofilm processes should lead to novel, effective control strategies for biofilm control and a resulting improvement in patient management.

Related Conferences:

World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; International Conference on Water Microbiology & Novel Technologies- July 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 3rd  Global Microbiologists Annual meeting -August 15-17, 2016 Portland, USA; Microbial Physiology conference- September 29-30, 2016; London, UK; Infectious Diseases Conference- Oct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; Clinical Microbiology Conference- October 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; 7th World Congress on Applied Microbiology, November 10-12, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey, Microbiology Society , International Union of Microbiological Societies , American Society for Microbiology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies European Union, and The Royal Society of Pathologists UK.

Track 8: Microbial Fermentation

Fermentation is the enzymatic decomposition and utilization of foodstuffs, particularly carbohydrates by microbes. Fermentation takes place throughout the gastrointestinal tract of all animals, but the intensity of fermentation depends on microbe numbers, which are generally highest in the large bowel. Thus, the large intestine is quantitatively the most important site of fermentation, except for species with fore stomachs (ruminants). Further, there are major differences in the contribution of fermentation to energy production of different species. In carnivores like dogs and cats, and even in omnivores like humans, fermentation generates rather few calories, but in herbivores, fermentation is a way of life.

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Probiotics & Functional Foods, September 26-28, 2016 Orlando, USA, International Conference on Water Microbiology and Novel Techniques, Chicago, USA, July 18-20, 2016, 4thInternational Conference on Oceanography and Marine Biology, Brisbane, Australia, July 18-20, 2016, 2nd International Congress on Biofuels and Bioenergy, August 29-31, 2016 Sao Paulo, Brazil,  International Conference on Microbial Physiology and Genomics  London. UK, September 29-30, 2016, Microbiology Society, International Society for Enzymology, Federation of European Biochemical Society, American Society for Microbiology.

Track 9: Microbes in Food

Microbes (or microorganisms) are organisms that are too small to be seen by the unaided eye. They include bacteria, fungi, protozoa, microalgae, and viruses. Microbes live in familiar settings such as soil, water, food, and animal intestines, as well as in more extreme settings such as rocks, glaciers, hot springs, and deep-sea vents. The wide variety of microbial habitats reflects an enormous diversity of biochemical and metabolic traits that have arisen by genetic variation and natural selection in microbial populations.

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Probiotics & Functional Foods, September 26-28, 2016 Orlando, USA, International Conference on Water Microbiology and Novel Techniques, Chicago, USA, July 18-20, 2016, 4thInternational Conference on Oceanography and Marine Biology, Brisbane, Australia, July 18-20, 2016, 2nd International Congress on Biofuels and Bioenergy, August 29-31, 2016 Sao Paulo, Brazil,  International Conference on Microbial Physiology and Genomics  London. UK, September 29-30, 2016, Microbiology Society, International Society for Enzymology, Federation of European Biochemical Society, American Society for Microbiology.

Track 10: Microbes Potential Uses

As the knowledge of bacteria and yeast-chemical behaviors grew, other biotechnological uses for the microbes were found. A few examples include the use of the bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus to produce yogurt, the exploitation of a number of different bacteria to produce a variety of cheeses, and the fermentation of cabbage to produce sauerkraut. In the agricultural sector, the discovery of the ability of Rhizobium spp. to convert elemental nitrogen to a form that was useable by a growing plant, led to the use of the microorganism as a living fertilizer that grew in association with the plant species.

Related Conferences:

World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; International Conference on Water Microbiology & Novel Technologies- July 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 3rd  Global Microbiologists Annual meeting -August 15-17, 2016 Portland, USA; Microbial Physiology conference- September 29-30, 2016; London, UK; Infectious Diseases Conference- Oct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; Clinical Microbiology Conference- October 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; 7th World Congress on Applied Microbiology, November 10-12, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey, Microbiology Society , International Union of Microbiological Societies , American Society for Microbiology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies European Union, and The Royal Society of Pathologists UK.

Track 11: Field of Probiotics

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts that are good for your health, especially your digestive system. We usually think of bacteria as something that causes diseases. But your body is full of bacteria, both good and bad. Probiotics are often called "good" or "helpful" bacteria because they help keep your gut healthy. Probiotics are naturally found in your body. You can also find them in some foods and supplements. It's only been since about the mid-1990s that people have wanted to know more about probiotics and their health benefits. Doctors often suggest them to help with digestive problems. And because of their newfound fame, you can find them in everything from yogurt to chocolate.

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Probiotics & Functional Foods, September 26-28, 2016 Orlando, USA, International Conference on Water Microbiology and Novel Techniques, Chicago, USA, July 18-20, 2016, 4thInternational Conference on Oceanography and Marine Biology, Brisbane, Australia, July 18-20, 2016, 2nd International Congress on Biofuels and Bioenergy, August 29-31, 2016 Sao Paulo, Brazil,  International Conference on Microbial Physiology and Genomics  London. UK, September 29-30, 2016, Microbiology Society, International Society for Enzymology, Federation of European Biochemical Society, American Society for Microbiology.

Track 12: Industrial Applications of Microbes 

Microbes have been used to produce products for thousands of years. Even in ancient times, vinegar was made by filtering alcohol through wood shavings, allowing microbes growing on the surfaces of the wood pieces to convert alcohol to vinegar. Likewise, the production of wine and beer uses another microbe — yeast — to convert sugars to alcohol. Even though people did not know for a long time that microbes were behind these transformations, it did not stop them from making and selling these products. Both of these are early examples of biotechnology — the use of microbes for economic or industrial purposes. This field advanced considerably with the many developments in microbiology, such as the invention of microscope. Once scientists learned about the genetics of microbes, and how their cells produce proteins, microbes could also be altered to function in many new, and useful, ways. This sparked the application of biotechnology to many industries, such as agriculture, energy and medicine.

Related Conferences:

2nd International Conference on  Retroviruses and Novel Drugs, June 30- July 01, Cape Town, South Africa; World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 3rd Microbiologists Annual Meeting, August 15-17, 2016, Portland, Oregon, USA; 2nd World Congress on Infectious Diseases, August 24-26, 2016, Philadelphia, USA; 3rd Euro-Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, September 5-7, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany; World Congress on Infection Prevention and Control, September 5-6, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany;  7th International Congress on Clinical Virology, October 13-14, 2016, Manchester, UK, American Society for Virology International Union of Microbiological Societies Pan-American Society for Clinical Virology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies  European Union, and European Society for Virology.

Track 13: Microbial Antibiotics

Ten times as many microbes live on or inside your body as you have cells. For the most part, we live peacefully alongside these alien hitchhikers. In fact, many of these microbes are actually beneficial. The microbes living in our digestive system break down food and produce useful vitamins. The millions of microbes that coat our skin and insides form a protective barrier against more dangerous microbes. Without them, our bodies would be open to microbial attack. In spite of the benefits, a relatively small number of microbes are harmful to humans. Many diseases and epidemics are caused by microbes: the plague during the Middle Ages, smallpox, AIDS, influenza, food poisoning and anthrax. These diseases result in severe illness, or even death. As scientists learn more about bacteria, fungi and viruses, they are better able to treat and prevent these diseases. Common treatments include antibiotics that kill bacteria and vaccines that help the body fight off viruses.

Related Conferences:

World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; International Conference on Water Microbiology & Novel Technologies- July 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 3rd  Global Microbiologists Annual meeting -August 15-17, 2016 Portland, USA; Microbial Physiology conference- September 29-30, 2016; London, UK; Infectious Diseases Conference- Oct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; Clinical Microbiology Conference- October 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; 7th World Congress on Applied Microbiology, November 10-12, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey, Microbiology Society , International Union of Microbiological Societies , American Society for Microbiology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies European Union, and The Royal Society of Pathologists UK.

Track 14: Microbial Genomes

Recently, the use of genetic techniques has become an important part of microbiology. Each microbe has its own distinct DNA sequence. This information can be used to accurately identify microbes. Genetic tests like this are very sensitive, so scientists can identify microbes more quickly than with other methods. This has been used during disease outbreaks, such as with the H1N1 influenza virus. Microbial genetics involves more than just identifying the type of microbe. A DNA sequence provides instructions for how an organism looks and functions. Scientists also study specific parts of microbial DNA to understand activities of the microbe, like how it converts carbon dioxide to energy, or how it builds its cell wall. They also study how DNA controls the reproduction of microbes. The techniques learned with microbes have been applied to other organisms, as well, enabling scientists to modify the genetic sequences of plants and animals. This changes how they look, or the activities of their cells.

Related Conferences:

World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; International Conference on Water Microbiology & Novel Technologies- July 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 3rd  Global Microbiologists Annual meeting -August 15-17, 2016 Portland, USA; Microbial Physiology conference- September 29-30, 2016; London, UK; Infectious Diseases Conference- Oct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; Clinical Microbiology Conference- October 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; 7th World Congress on Applied Microbiology, November 10-12, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey, Microbiology Society , International Union of Microbiological Societies , American Society for Microbiology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies European Union, and The Royal Society of Pathologists UK.

Track 15: Application of Microbes in Medicine

The human microbiome is that the community of bacterium, viruses, fungi and alternative microbes that inhabit near to any a part of our bodies. They are essential for our survival - among different things, they assist us digest food, synthesize vitamins, and maintain a healthy system. Recent developments in genetic engineering, these microorganisms may be changed by inserting new or altered genes into their dna. This, in turn, will give them the ability to halt inherited diseases, or produce proteins, hormones, enzymes, antibiotics and alternative vital compounds – called biodrugs or biopharmaceuticals – which will be used for the prevention and treatment of diseases like diabetes, cancer, anaemia, inflammatory intestine disease and obesity. This is often what’s called microbic medication.

Related Conferences:

2nd International Conference on  Retroviruses and Novel Drugs, June 30- July 01, Cape Town, South Africa; World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 3rd Microbiologists Annual Meeting, August 15-17, 2016, Portland, Oregon, USA; 2nd World Congress on Infectious Diseases, August 24-26, 2016, Philadelphia, USA; 3rd Euro-Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, September 5-7, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany; World Congress on Infection Prevention and Control, September 5-6, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany;  7th International Congress on Clinical Virology, October 13-14, 2016, Manchester, UK, American Society for Virology International Union of Microbiological Societies Pan-American Society for Clinical Virology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies  European Union, and European Society for Virology.

Track 16: Environmental Microbiology

Microbial life is amazingly diverse and microorganisms literally cover the planet. It is estimated that we know fewer than 1% of the microbial species on Earth. Microorganisms can survive in some of the most extreme environments on the planet and some can survive high temperatures, often above 100°C, as found in geysers, black smokers, and oil wells. Some are found in very cold habitats and others in highly salt|saline, acidic, or alkaline water.

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Probiotics & Functional Foods, September 26-28, 2016 Orlando, USA, International Conference on Water Microbiology and Novel Techniques, Chicago, USA, July 18-20, 2016, 4thInternational Conference on Oceanography and Marine Biology, Brisbane, Australia, July 18-20, 2016, 2nd International Congress on Biofuels and Bioenergy, August 29-31, 2016 Sao Paulo, Brazil,  International Conference on Microbial Physiology and Genomics  London. UK, September 29-30, 2016, Microbiology Society, International Society for Enzymology, Federation of European Biochemical Society, American Society for Microbiology.

Track 17: Microbial Metabolites

Microorganisms live in a world of chemical signals. They use small molecular weight compounds (<2,500 amu), known as metabolites, to regulate their own growth and development, to encourage other organisms beneficial to them and suppress organisms that are harmful. To control competitors, microbes produce antibiotics, such as penicillin, streptomycin and erythromycin, antifungals, such as nystatin, amphotericin and cycloheximide, antiprotozoan metabolites including monensin, salinomycin and trichostatins and herbicides like herbicidin and bialophos.  To reduce predation by larger organisms they produce nematocides, such as the avermectins and paraherquamide, and insecticides such as the milbemycins, piericidins and spinosads. To encourage plants and animals they produce growth stimulants and metabolites that inhibit pathogens. Many microbial metabolites are exquisitely selective, others are broadly active against many species. Organisms resilient or resistant to the effects of metabolites thrive; sensitive organisms falter.  Microbes use metabolites to regulate the environment in which they live and from this platform they control the function and shape of much of the world’s biodiversity. Microbial metabolites represent an incredibly diverse array of chemistry. Microbes can make molecules that synthetic chemists cannot access. While over 25,000 microbial metabolites have been reported in the scientific literature, fewer than 2% of these have ever been readily available to the wider research community.  Most metabolites have only ever existed in small quantities in the research laboratory in which they were discovered and their biological activity has never been fully investigated.

Related Conferences:

2nd International Conference on  Retroviruses and Novel Drugs, June 30- July 01, Cape Town, South Africa; World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 3rd Microbiologists Annual Meeting, August 15-17, 2016, Portland, Oregon, USA; 2nd World Congress on Infectious Diseases, August 24-26, 2016, Philadelphia, USA; 3rd Euro-Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, September 5-7, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany; World Congress on Infection Prevention and Control, September 5-6, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany;  7th International Congress on Clinical Virology, October 13-14, 2016, Manchester, UK, American Society for Virology International Union of Microbiological Societies Pan-American Society for Clinical Virology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies  European Union, and European Society for Virology.

Track 18: Microbial Biofuels

Fossil fuels like coal and oil have played a critical role in humanity’s recent history, providing a vast energy source which has fueled much of society’s development and industrialization. These fuels are still the primary source of energy for the world’s developed nations, and yet it is agreed that these traditional sources of energy cannot continue to power humanity’s growth into the future. The demand for oil production is at an all-time high, and will only increase as developing nations continue to grow. Furthermore, many experts predict that the rate of world oil production has already peaked, and that it will only decrease from now onwards as fewer and fewer oil reserves are discovered. This decreasing supply and rising demand will drive up the price of oil and other fossil fuels, and will eventually make them economically unsustainable . The use of fossil fuels poses other problems as well, most notably that their consumption is environmentally unsustainable. Burning fossil fuels produces enormous quantities of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, which has a negative impact on the Earth’s environment by contributing to global warming . For all of these reasons, there is great incentive to pursue the development of renewable energy sources, particularly microbial biofuels. Microbial metabolism is incredibly varied, and can both utilize and produce a wide variety of useful molecules. Many microbial systems are also well characterized and easy to manipulate genetically, and scientific advances will only make these systems easier to work with in the future . Although there is no biofuel option currently available which solves all of the economic and environmental issues associated with fossil fuels, the potential for both “fine-tuning” biofuel-producing microbes, and genetically modifying species to be able to efficiently make use of otherwise useless materials and byproducts, makes microbial biofuels an appealing target for research.

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Probiotics & Functional Foods, September 26-28, 2016 Orlando, USA, International Conference on Water Microbiology and Novel Techniques, Chicago, USA, July 18-20, 2016, 4thInternational Conference on Oceanography and Marine Biology, Brisbane, Australia, July 18-20, 2016, 2nd International Congress on Biofuels and Bioenergy, August 29-31, 2016 Sao Paulo, Brazil,  International Conference on Microbial Physiology and Genomics  London. UK, September 29-30, 2016, Microbiology Society, International Society for Enzymology, Federation of European Biochemical Society, American Society for Microbiology.

Track 19: Microbes And Energy

During vinegar production with wood chips, bacteria grow on the surface of the wood, forming what is called a biofilm. Bacteria attached to a surface like this can produce many compounds, as well as block the flow of a fluid. The latter behavior has been used to increase the amount of oil extracted from an oil field. Bacteria growing in the wells block areas that are more open. When water is then pumped into the ground, the biofilms drive the water into other areas that still contain oil. This then forces the oil to the surface. Microbes can also be used to create fuels directly. Certain bacteria ferment glycerol to form ethanol, a biofuel that can be used in automobiles. The glycerol is a by-product of biodiesel production, but it is more valuable if converted to fuel. With genetic engineering, microbes can also be altered to produce fuels that they don’t usually make. One company has modified the DNA of yeast to create biofuel from sugarcane feedstock. The challenge to all of these methods is creating a process that produces fuels more easily and cheaply than conventional methods.

Related Conferences:

2nd International Conference on  Retroviruses and Novel Drugs, June 30- July 01, Cape Town, South Africa; World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 3rd Microbiologists Annual Meeting, August 15-17, 2016, Portland, Oregon, USA; 2nd World Congress on Infectious Diseases, August 24-26, 2016, Philadelphia, USA; 3rd Euro-Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, September 5-7, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany; World Congress on Infection Prevention and Control, September 5-6, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany;  7th International Congress on Clinical Virology, October 13-14, 2016, Manchester, UK, American Society for Virology International Union of Microbiological Societies Pan-American Society for Clinical Virology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies  European Union, and European Society for Virology.

Track  20 : Applications of Extremophile

Extremophiles are organisms that can grow and thrive in harsh conditions, e.g., extremes of temperature, pH, salinity, radiation, pressure and oxygen tension. Thermophilic, halophilic and radiation-resistant organisms are all microbes, some of which are able to withstand multiple extremes. Psychrophiles, or cold-loving organisms, include not only microbes, but fish that live in polar waters and animals that can withstand freezing. Extremophiles are structurally adapted at a molecular level to withstand these conditions. Thermophiles have particularly stable proteins and cell membranes, psychrophiles have flexible cellular proteins and membranes and/or antifreeze proteins, salt-resistant halophiles contain compatible solutes or high concentrations of inorganic ions, and acidophiles and alkaliphiles are able to pump ions to keep their internal pH close to neutrality. Their interest to veterinary medicine resides in their capacity to be pathogenic, and as sources of enzymes and other molecules for diagnostic and pharmaceutical purposes. In particular, thermostable DNA polymerases are a mainstay of PCR-based diagnostics.

Related Conferences:

2nd International Conference on  Retroviruses and Novel Drugs, June 30- July 01, Cape Town, South Africa; World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 3rd Microbiologists Annual Meeting, August 15-17, 2016, Portland, Oregon, USA; 2nd World Congress on Infectious Diseases, August 24-26, 2016, Philadelphia, USA; 3rd Euro-Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, September 5-7, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany; World Congress on Infection Prevention and Control, September 5-6, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany;  7th International Congress on Clinical Virology, October 13-14, 2016, Manchester, UK, American Society for Virology International Union of Microbiological Societies Pan-American Society for Clinical Virology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies  European Union, and European Society for Virology.

Track 21: Microbes in Agriculture

Microbes include fungi, bacteria and viruses. Farmers and ranchers often think of microbes as pests that are destructive to their crops or animals (as well as themselves), but many microbes are beneficial. Soil microbes (bacteria and fungi) are essential for decomposing organic matter and recycling old plant material. Some soil bacteria and fungi form relationships with plant roots that provide important nutrients like nitrogen or phosphorus. Fungi can colonize upper parts of plants and provide many benefits, including drought tolerance, heat tolerance, resistance to insects and resistance to plant diseases.

 Related Conferences:

World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; International Conference on Water Microbiology & Novel Technologies- July 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 3rd  Global Microbiologists Annual meeting -August 15-17, 2016 Portland, USA; Microbial Physiology conference- September 29-30, 2016; London, UK; Infectious Diseases Conference- Oct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; Clinical Microbiology Conference- October 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; 7th World Congress on Applied Microbiology, November 10-12, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey, Microbiology Society , International Union of Microbiological Societies , American Society for Microbiology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies European Union, and The Royal Society of Pathologists UK.

Track 22: Microbial Ecology

Microorganisms, by their omnipresence, impact the entire biosphere. Microbial life plays a primary role in regulating biogeochemical systems in virtually all of our planet's environments, including some of the most extreme, from frozen environments and acidic lakes, to hydrothermal vents at the bottom of deepest oceans, and some of the most familiar, such as the human small intestine. As a consequence of the quantitative magnitude of microbial life (Whitman and coworkers calculated 5.0×1030 cells, eight orders of magnitude greater than the number of stars in the observable universe) microbes, by virtue of their biomass alone, constitute a significant carbon sink. Aside from carbon fixation, microorganisms’ key collective metabolic processes (including nitrogen fixation, methane metabolism, and sulfur metabolism) control global biogeochemical cycling. The immensity of microorganisms’ production is such that, even in the total absence of eukaryotic life, these processes would likely continue unchanged.

Related Conferences:

2nd International Conference on  Retroviruses and Novel Drugs, June 30- July 01, Cape Town, South Africa; World Congress on Microbiology, November 28-29, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 3rd Microbiologists Annual Meeting, August 15-17, 2016, Portland, Oregon, USA; 2nd World Congress on Infectious Diseases, August 24-26, 2016, Philadelphia, USA; 3rd Euro-Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, September 5-7, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany; World Congress on Infection Prevention and Control, September 5-6, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany;  7th International Congress on Clinical Virology, October 13-14, 2016, Manchester, UK, American Society for Virology International Union of Microbiological Societies Pan-American Society for Clinical Virology USA, Federation of European Microbiological Societies  European Union, and European Society for Virology.

 

 

 

 

 

Conference Series LLC is organizing 2nd World Congress on Beneficial Microbes: Food, Pharma, Aqua & Beverages Industry on September, 22-24, 2016 Phoenix, USA. The theme of the conference is “Exploiting the power of Microbes for the Industrial Development”. This congress is expecting audience such as experts from food microbiology, aquaculture microbiology, probiotics, and experts from academics as well as industrial microbiology.

Beneficial microbes-2016 is a remarkable event designed for Directors, Researchers, Professors, and Scholars from both academia and industry. Beneficial microbes-2016 invites participants from all leading universities, research institutions and diagnostic companies to share their research experiences on all aspects of this rapidly expanding field and thereby, providing a showcase of the latest research.

Who should attend?

  • Microbiologists
  • Bacteriologists
  • Virologists
  • Parasitologists
  • Mycologists
  • Pathologists
  • Pharmacists
  • Epidemiologists
  • Health Care Professionals

Why to attend?

With members from around the world focused on learning about global trends on emerging benefits of microorganisms and its advances in therapeutic and diagnostic market, this is your best opportunity to reach the largest assemblage of participants from various communities. This particular conference conduct presentations, distributes information, conducts meetings with current and potential scientists, make a splash with new drug developments, and receive name recognition at this 3 day event. World renowned speakers, the most recent therapeutic and diagnostic techniques, developments, and the Novel technologies are the hallmarks of this conference.

Targeted Audience

  • Directors, Board Members, Presidents, Vice Presidents, Deans and Head of the Departments
  •  Researchers, Scientists, Faculties, Students
  • Medical Colleges
  • Pharmaceutical Companies and Industries
  • Medical Devices Manufacturing Companies
  • Drug Manufacturing Companies and Industries
  • Laboratory Technicians and Diagnostic Companies
  • Business Entrepreneurs and Industrialists
  • Training Institutes
  • Software Developing Companies
  • Data Management Companies

For Scientific Sessions please go through the

link: http://beneficialmicrobes.omicsgroup.com/call-for-abstracts.php

For Abstract Submission please go through the

link: http://beneficialmicrobes.omicsgroup.com//abstract-submission.php

 

The global clinical microbiology market is valued at $6,727.29 million in 2014 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 13.03% between 2014 and 2019. Increasing disease burden of infectious diseases and increased funding for healthcare expenditure are the important growth drivers for this market during the forecast period. The pharmaceuticals application segment accounted for the largest share of the microbiology market in 2014, while the food application segment is expected grow at the highest CAGR between 2014 and 2019 in the global microbiology market. The clinical microbiology market is segmented on the basis of products into consumables and instruments. The consumables product segment is further sub segmented into kits and reagents. The instruments segment is sub segmented into automated microbiology instruments, laboratory instruments, and microbiology analyzers. The automated microbiology instruments are expected to grow at the highest growth rate in the instruments segment. The incubators are expected to grow at the highest growth rate in the laboratory instruments market. Mass spectrometers, are expected to grow at the highest growth rate in the microbiology analyzers segment. In the consumables segment kits are expected to account for the largest share and expected to grow at the highest growth rate during the forecast period. The respiratory diseases segment accounted for the largest share of the clinical microbiology market in 2014. This application segment is expected to grow at the highest CAGR between 2014 and 2019 in the clinical microbiology market. The geographic analysis revealed that North America accounted for the largest share of the global clinical microbiology market in 2014. The Asian regional segment, on the other hand, is expected to register a double-digit growth rate from 2014 to 2019, owing to the increased healthcare spending in this region.

Bacteriology-2014

2nd International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases (Bacteriology-2014)was held during November 17-19, 2014 at Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Chicago-North Shore, USA. The conference was marked with the attendance of Editorial Board Members of supported OMICS Group Journals, Scientists, young and brilliant researchers, business delegates and talented student communities representing more than 25 countries, who made this conference fruitful and productive.

This conference was based on the theme “Current concepts and diagnosis in bacteriology” which included the following scientific tracks:  

  • Bacterial Pathogenesis, Virulence & Countermeasures
  • News in Bacterial Structure, Morphology & Metabolism
  • Natural Microbial Defenses & Host Immunity
  • Plant-Microbe Symbiosis & Pathology
  • Multi-Pathogen Infections & Post-Infection Sequelea
  • Epidemiology, Emerging Infectious Diseases & Public Response Planning
  • Medical Microbiology - From Benchtop to Clinic
  • Animal Modeling and Veterinary Bacteriology
  • Advances in Antimicrobials, Vaccines & Therapeutics
  • Microbial Genomics, Systems Biology and Bioinformatics
  • Industrial and Applied Bacteriology

Bacteriology-2014 is moderated by Dr. Gregory A. Buck from Virginia Commonwealth University, USA

We are thankful to our below Honourable guests and Keynote Speakers for their generous support and suggestions.

  • Michael Y. Galperin– National Center for Biotechnology Information, USA
  • Ed T Buurman - AstraZeneca, USA
  • Massimo Cecaro - EIC, National Councilor of Italian Medical Press, Italy
  • Stephen Hanessian - University of Montreal, Canada
  • Marcelo E. Tolmasky - California State University Fullerton, USA
  • Akira Kaji - University of Pennsylvania, USA

The conference proceedings were carried out through various Scientific-sessions and plenary lectures, of which the following topics were highlighted as Keynote-presentations:

·         Diversity of the Human Vaginal Microbiome:  Gregory A. Buck, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA

·         Functional annotation of bacterial genomes one COG at a time: Michael Y. Galperin– National Center for Biotechnology Information, USA

  • Negamycin induces translational stalling and miscoding by binding to the small subunit head domain of the Escherichia coli ribosome: Ed T Buurman - AstraZeneca, USA
  • Emerging infectious diseases: Anthropozoonoses and global change: Massimo Cecaro - EIC, National Councilor of Italian Medical Press, Italy
  • RNA binding molecules: Structure, function and synthesis: Stephen Hanessian - University of Montreal, Canada
  • Multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens: the need for action: Marcelo E. Tolmasky - California State University Fullerton, USA
  • Ribosome recycling in prokaryotes and eukaryotes: Akira Kaji - University of Pennsylvania, USA
  • Various sessions were chaired and co chaired by: Phillip E. Klebba, Kansas State University, USA,    Abu Salim Mustafa, Kuwait University, Kuwait; Kei Amemiya, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, USA, Joyce A. Sutcliffe,Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals, USA; Thea Sesardic, National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, UK, Kwang Poo Chang, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, USA; Eric T. Harvill, Penn State University, USA, Wanda C. Reygaert, Oakland University, USA

·         Poster Session was judged by Michael Y. Galperin– National Center for Biotechnology Information, USA  and Ilaria Ferlenghi, Novartis Vaccines Research Centre, Italy

 

OMICS Group has taken the privilege of felicitating Bacteriology-2014 Organizing Committee, Editorial Board Members and Keynote Speakers who supported for the success of this event.


The esteemed guests, Keynote speakers, well-known researchers and delegates shared their innovative research and vast experience through their fabulous presentations at the podium of grand Bacteriology-2014. We are glad to inform that all accepted abstracts for the conference have been published in OMICS Group Journal of Bacteriology and Parasitology as a special issue.

We are also obliged to various delegate experts, company representatives and other eminent personalities who supported the conference by facilitating active discussion forums. We sincerely thank the Organizing Committee Members for their gracious presence, support, and assistance. With the unique feedback from the conference, OMICS Group would like to announce the commencement of the “3rd International Conference on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases" to be held August 4-6, 2015 at Melia Valencia, Valencia, Spain


Past Reports  Gallery  

Probiotics-2013

The International Conference and Exhibition on Probiotics, hosted by the OMICS Groupwas held during November 19-21, 2012 at Hilton San Antonio Airport, San Antonio, USA. Generous response and active participation was received from the Organizing Committee & Editorial Board Members of OMICS Group Journals as well as from scientists, researchers and leaders from government organizations, students who made this conference as one of most successful and productive events in 2012 from OMICS Group

The conference was carried out through various sessions, in which the discussions were held on the following scientific tracks: 

  • Track 1: Molecular Nutrition
  • Track 2: Types of Probiotics
  • Track 3: Applications of Probiotics
  • Track 4: Current Research and Future Perspectives on Probiotics
  • Track 5: Health Benefits of Probiotics
  • Track 6: Regulatory Issues and Safety Challenges
  • Track 7: Probiotics in Aquaculture Practices
  • Track 8: Microbial Fermentation
  • Track 9: Food Technology and Dairy Technology
  • Track 10: Microbial Pathogenesis
  • Track 11: Microbes as Probiotics


The response to International Conference and Exhibition on Probiotics was huge and was attended by about 150 delegates representing 30 countries from different parts of the world. 

The conference was initiated with a series of invited lectures delivered by both Honorable Guests and members of the Keynote Forum. 

The conference was initiated with Opening remarks by Dr. S. K. Dash followed by Keynote Forum. Keynote Forum included S.K. Dash, South Dakota State University, USA; Min-Tze Liong, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia; Wilhelm Holzapfel, Handong Global University, South Korea; Liubov Sichel, VP Research and Development for Pure Research Products, USA. 

All the above mentioned keynote speakers gave their energetic and fruitful contributions atInternational Conference and Exhibition on Probiotics. Day 2 included exhaustive“Student Poster Award" and “Young Scientist Challenge Trophy” competitions participated by young researchers and veterans. 

The “Student Poster Award" competition was awarded to Ms. Chiharu Ishii, Keio University, Japan for poster on “Evaluation of the effects of age and diet on the gut ecosystem via multiple omics” and The “Young Scientist Challenge Trophy" competition was awarded to Mr. Stefan Roland Herbel, Free University, Germany for talk on “Detection, identification and quantification of different Probiotic Strains in food by using a multiplex qPCR method”

All accepted abstracts have been indexed in OMICS Group Journal of Food Processing and Technology as a special issue. The theme of this Conference was on "Future of Probiotics-Visions and Opportunities". Based on this, speaker's discussions included many recommendations. 

We are Thankful to Dr. S. K. Dash & UAS Laboratories for the generous patronage as Gold Sponsor for Probiotics-2012. We thank Dr. Wilhelm Holzapfel, President of International Committee on Food Microbiology and Hygiene (ICFMH) for sponsoring the “ICFMH-Student Poster Award”. Also we thank Mr. YC Mah & B-CROBES for sponsoring the “Young Scientist Challenge Trophy” at Probiotics-2012. 

We are also obliged to various external experts, company representatives and other eminent personalities who supported the conference by facilitating the discussion forums. Our sincere thanks to Organizing Committee Members S.K. Dash, South Dakota State University, USA;Min-Tze Liong, University Sains Malaysia, Malaysia; Wilhelm Holzapfel, Handong Global University, South Korea; Gregory Leyer, DuPont Nutrition & Health, USA; Lawrence J Hoberman, Health by Design, USA; Svetoslav Todorov, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil;Shinji Fukuda, Keio University, Japan for their gracious presence, support and assistance towards Probiotics-2012, and with their unique feedback,


Past Reports  Gallery  

Probiotics-2012

The International Conference and Exhibition on Probiotics, hosted by the OMICS Groupwas held during November 19-21, 2012 at Hilton San Antonio Airport, San Antonio, USA. Generous response and active participation was received from the Organizing Committee & Editorial Board Members of OMICS Group Journals as well as from scientists, researchers and leaders from government organizations, students who made this conference as one of most successful and productive events in 2012 from OMICS Group

The conference was carried out through various sessions, in which the discussions were held on the following scientific tracks: 

  • Track 1: Molecular Nutrition
  • Track 2: Types of Probiotics
  • Track 3: Applications of Probiotics
  • Track 4: Current Research and Future Perspectives on Probiotics
  • Track 5: Health Benefits of Probiotics
  • Track 6: Regulatory Issues and Safety Challenges
  • Track 7: Probiotics in Aquaculture Practices
  • Track 8: Microbial Fermentation
  • Track 9: Food Technology and Dairy Technology
  • Track 10: Microbial Pathogenesis
  • Track 11: Microbes as Probiotics


The response to International Conference and Exhibition on Probiotics was huge and was attended by about 150 delegates representing 30 countries from different parts of the world. 

The conference was initiated with a series of invited lectures delivered by both Honorable Guests and members of the Keynote Forum. 

The conference was initiated with Opening remarks by Dr. S. K. Dash followed by Keynote Forum. Keynote Forum included S.K. Dash, South Dakota State University, USA; Min-Tze Liong, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia; Wilhelm Holzapfel, Handong Global University, South Korea; Liubov Sichel, VP Research and Development for Pure Research Products, USA. 

All the above mentioned keynote speakers gave their energetic and fruitful contributions atInternational Conference and Exhibition on Probiotics. Day 2 included exhaustive“Student Poster Award" and “Young Scientist Challenge Trophy” competitions participated by young researchers and veterans. 

The “Student Poster Award" competition was awarded to Ms. Chiharu Ishii, Keio University, Japan for poster on “Evaluation of the effects of age and diet on the gut ecosystem via multiple omics” and The “Young Scientist Challenge Trophy" competition was awarded to Mr. Stefan Roland Herbel, Free University, Germany for talk on “Detection, identification and quantification of different Probiotic Strains in food by using a multiplex qPCR method”

All accepted abstracts have been indexed in OMICS Group Journal of Food Processing and Technology as a special issue. The theme of this Conference was on "Future of Probiotics-Visions and Opportunities". Based on this, speaker's discussions included many recommendations. 

We are Thankful to Dr. S. K. Dash & UAS Laboratories for the generous patronage as Gold Sponsor for Probiotics-2012. We thank Dr. Wilhelm Holzapfel, President of International Committee on Food Microbiology and Hygiene (ICFMH) for sponsoring the “ICFMH-Student Poster Award”. Also we thank Mr. YC Mah & B-CROBES for sponsoring the “Young Scientist Challenge Trophy” at Probiotics-2012. 

We are also obliged to various external experts, company representatives and other eminent personalities who supported the conference by facilitating the discussion forums. Our sincere thanks to Organizing Committee Members S.K. Dash, South Dakota State University, USA;Min-Tze Liong, University Sains Malaysia, Malaysia; Wilhelm Holzapfel, Handong Global University, South Korea; Gregory Leyer, DuPont Nutrition & Health, USA; Lawrence J Hoberman, Health by Design, USA; Svetoslav Todorov, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil;Shinji Fukuda, Keio University, Japan for their gracious presence, support and assistance towards Probiotics-2012, and with their unique feedback, OMICS Group would like to announce the "2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Probiotics" to be held in 2013. 


Past Reports  Gallery  

Beneficial microbes-2015

Beneficial Microbes-2015 Past Conference Report

 

The success of the Microbiology Conferences has given us the prospect to bring the gathering once again with the World Congress on Beneficial Microbes: Food, Pharma, Aqua & Beverages Industry during August 25-27, 2015, at Hotel Melia Valencia in Valencia, Spain hosted by OMICS International.

The conference focused on advancement in the field of microbes especially beneficial microbes by accentuating the theme “Exploiting the Power of Microbes for the Industrial Development”. The meeting engrossed a vicinity of enlightening discussions on novel subjects like

·         Roles of Microbes in Aqua Culture

·         Probiotics and Fermentation Process

·         Biodegradation

·         Research and Development: Instrumentation and Food Safety

·         Genetics & Genomics

·         Bacteriophages: Agriculture, Energy, Medicine and Apoptosis

·         Genetic Engineering of Microbes

 

OMICS International would like to extend its warm gratitude & wishes to Alexander Sulakvelidze, Vice-President & Chief Scientist, Research and Development, Intralytix, Inc., USA for addressing the gathering with an alluring symposium on the topic, “Bacteriophages: Beneficial microbes at their best”.


The conference was embarked with an opening ceremony followed by a series of lectures delivered by both Honourable Guests and Members of the Keynote Forum. The adepts who promulgated the theme with their exquisite talk were:

·         Dr. Marika Mikelsaar, University of Tartu, Estonia

·         Dr. Yehuda Shoenfeld, Tel-Aviv University, Israel

·         Dr. Jerry Wells, Wageningen University, The Netherlands

·         Dr. Elias Hakalehto, University of Eastern Finland, Finland

·         Dr. Zhigang (Peter) Zhou, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China

 

We congratulate the Best Poster Award Winner, Stephane Duboux, Nestlé Research Center, Switzerland for presenting a pioneering research work and all other poster winners for their outstanding performance in the field of Microbiology emphasizing the Beneficial Microbes and appreciates all the participants who put their efforts in poster presentations and sincerely wishes them success in future endeavors.

OMICS International offers its heartfelt appreciation to the Organizing Committee Members, adepts of field, various outside experts, company representatives and other eminent personalities who interlaced with OMICS group in supporting and making the conference as never before one.

“Your rejoinder is our inspiration”; keeping this motto in mind and being witnessed the triumph of Beneficial Microbes-2015, OMICS Group is delighted to announce the next event.  Mark your calendars for the upcoming extravaganza, the 2nd World Congress on Beneficial Microbes: Food, Pharma, Aqua & Beverages to be held during September 22-24, 2016 in Phoenix, USA

 

Let us meet again @ Beneficial Microbes-2016

 


Past Reports  Gallery  

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